Archive for the ‘benefits of breastfeeding’ Category

IUD’s and Milk Supply

October 24, 2011

About 6 weeks to 2 months postpartum, your health care provider will bring up the subject of birth control. Even though sex may be the farthest thing from your mind! Your doctor has your mental and physical health in mind when he talks to you about a birth control method. It can be devastating emotionally and physically to get pregnant again before you are ready.

There are many birth control methods that are compatible with breastfeeding and have absolutely zero risk of harming milk production. Condoms and other barrier methods are safe and effective when used appropriately. But these methods are considered “risky” to many doctors because they rely on patient compliance and errors can occur. More and more doctors, therefore, are encouraging new mothers to use an IUD for birth control.

There is a relatively new IUD on the market, that definitely can and does create problems for breastfeeding mothers. It’s called Mirena. The Mirena IUD releases small amounts of synthetic progesterone over time. Progesterone is the hormone that keeps you from lactating during pregnancy. It follows that progesterone, even a small amount, could cause a reduction in milk supply for a breastfeeding mother.

There is no research that I know of to back up this claim. But I have stories from breastfeeding moms.  I would bet that there are many others who didn’t put 2 and 2 together and just believed that their milk ”dried up” all by itself or because they had returned to work. Since the resumption of birth control and going back to work often occur at about the same time, a mom could easily assume that being away from her baby for 8 hours per day is what caused the drop in milk production. So who knows how many mothers quit breastfeeding because of the Mirena? I believe the number is much, much larger than is reported.

Margie called me because her milk supply had plummeted to practically nothing. Her baby could not breastfeed, but she had been pumping since his birth so she has always known exactly how much milk she produced.

After Margie’s milk came in, she was able to pump 4 ounces every 2 hours—with a hand pump! She continued pumping regularly and always had more than her baby could eat. When her baby was 2 months old, her doctor recommended the Mirena IUD. She agreed that it sounded like a good birth control method for her. She noticed a gradual, slight dip in her milk supply within a week. She thought maybe it was because of the hand pump, so she tried a professional grade pump. Her supply continued to decrease, so she rented a hospital grade pump. There was no improvement. A mere six weeks after the IUD was inserted, her milk supply had practically vanished—down to 2 oz per day. She had the IUD removed.

Maggie is now working hard, with my guidance, to increase her milk production. There is no doubt in her mind (or mine) what caused her supply to plummet. It makes me sad that anyone would have to go through what she has gone through. Especially since it was completely avoidable.

So what should you do about birth control? Talk to your doctor about options. Let him know that breastfeeding is important to you and that you want to avoid risking your milk supply. Explore all options—keeping in mind that any birth control method is largely a “back up” method if you are fully breastfeeding and your baby is under 6 months old. . Avoid any birth control method that relies on hormones. Remember that you will be breastfeeding for a relatively short period of time in your child’s life. The Mirena and other hormonal methods may be a good choice for you when your baby is older and is not reliant on your milk for nourishment. Lastly, if you have already instituted birth control that includes hormones, and you are concerned about milk production, please call me for help!

Note: Many breastfeeding mothers use the Mirena IUD with no noticeable effect on breastfeeding. Unfortunately, it’s impossible to predict how an individual mom’s milk supply will react to the introduction of progesterone.

See also, “Breastfeeding and Fertility”   This link will take you to the latest version of my blog and website.  I hope you enjoy the new look!

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Tongue Tie: More than “Just” a Breastfeeding Problem

October 2, 2011

Important notice:  This blog and all its content and subsequent content is now at www.second9months.com.  Please visit there often for updates and new posts!

Let’s assume for a moment that breastfeeding is not important. That the oral development that breastfeeding provides is inconsequential. We will ignore, for just a moment, the fact that the act of breastfeeding helps develop the baby’s jaw, his facial muscles and properly shapes the palate to make room for his future teeth. We’ll ignore all of that so that I can give you a few other reasons to agree to have your baby’s frenulum clipped. Just in case the possibility of pain free, effective breastfeeding is not a good enough reason for you.

The reason I’m being just a bit sarcastic is because there are plenty of health care professionals out there who do not “believe in” freeing a tongue tied baby’s tongue “just” so he can breastfeed. “After all,” they say, “..you can just feed your baby pumped milk or formula from a bottle.”

Let’s say you are pondering that question yourself. And you don’t want to put your baby through even a second of pain—however minor—if you don’t have to. And, up until the moment your lactation consultant told you your baby is tongue tied, you’d never heard of such a thing. Why should your baby have a frenotomy (clipping the frenulum) when it’s only going to help with breastfeeding and breastfeeding is such a short time in your baby’s life? I’ll tell you why. Because freeing the tongue with a quick clip now may help your baby avoid health problems in childhood and even into adulthood.

The tongue is a very strong muscle and that frenulum is an inelastic cord that is constantly pulling on the floor of the mouth and/or the lower gum ridge (called the alveolar ridge) when the tongue tries to move normally. Without normal tongue movements the oral cavity does not develop properly and since one body part is connected to the other, problems can occur in the rest of the body as well. Here are some effects of tongue tie that are not breastfeeding related.

  • Ineffective oral hygiene
  • Tooth decay
  • Crowding of teeth—especially lower teeth
  • Orthodontia
  • Lisps and other speech impairments
  • Excess saliva production–frenulum pulls salivary glans to unnatural position.
  • Fatigue with speaking
  • Shame, embarrassment with speaking
  • High, arched or “bubble” palate
  • Choking
  • Reflux
  • Snoring
  • Sleep apnea
  • Headaches

So now you know. If your baby is tongue tied and you have been wondering if a frenotomy is “just” for breastfeeding, wonder no more. Your baby will thank you some day!  

See also, “My Baby is Tongue Tied?”

Breastfeeding Diet Quiz

September 16, 2011

This is a test! Please read the following statements and respond “true” or “false” to each one.

1. If I breastfeed, I have to eat a bland diet.

2. If I eat broccoli, my baby will have gas.

 3.  If I have a glass of wine, I have to “pump and dump.”

4.  I cannot drink coffee while breastfeeding.

5.  If I eat chocolate, my breastfed baby will get diarrhea.

6.  I have to drink lots of milk to produce milk for my baby.

7.  I can’t eat spicy foods and breastfeed my baby.

If you answered false to each question, congratulations! Your score is 100 percent!

1. Babies love a varied diet. One study demonstrated that babies nurse longer after their mothers ate garlic.

2. It is a rare baby who doesn’t like nutritious vegetables. On the other hand, if your baby seems to be gassy after a particular food, try avoiding it for a few days and then re-introduce it just to be sure.

3. Drinking alcohol when breastfeeding is NOT the same as drinking while you’re pregnant. An occasional drink is just fine while breastfeeding.

4 and 5. Caffeine and chocolate in moderation are fine for mom and baby.

6. When was the last time you saw an adult cow or any other adult mammal drink milk?

7.  Spicy foods? Mothers all over the world breastfeed and enjoy the foods of their culture.

So, indulge in the nutritious foods you love. Enjoy the occasional pleasure of a glass of wine or some yummy chocolate. You deserve itImportant notice:  

This blog and all its content and subsequent content is now at www.second9months.com.  Please visit there often for updates and new posts!

Nipple Confusion…Really?

September 7, 2011

I have never, in all my years of breastfeeding help, seen a case of nipple confusion. There, I said it. For many years I thought I saw it. I bought the whole concept that introduction of bottles too early would cause a baby to reject his mother’s breast. That somehow the baby would get “confused” and suddenly not know how to breastfeed.

So what made me change my tune? The babies themselves. They proved to me over and over again that the idea of nipple confusion is nonsense. They showed me that they are infant mammals and that mammals are hard-wired to do this thing we call breastfeeding. And they showed me that they are born to be adaptable and perfectly capable of adjusting to a wide variety of challenges that life doles out on a daily basis.

But, please… don’t listen to what I have to say about this. Listen to the babies. They taught me. Maybe they can teach you too!

Here are the stories of just a few of the many, many babies who teach me every day:

Case 1–Baby could not latch on to breast. Nipple shield was given to mom to help with latch and milk transfer. Baby used nipple shield for 4 months. By 5 months of age she had completely transitioned from the shield and was happily breastfeeding all by herself.

Case 2– Twins born prematurely. Neither could breastfeed at birth and needed a lot of help to suck at all. Eventually they learned to bottle feed well. Mom pumped for 3 months so these babies could have her milk. At 3 months, as mom was bathing with one of the babies, he rooted and latched and suckled. Encouraged, she tried to nurse the other twin and he did the same thing. They never looked back.

Case 3– Mom pumped and bottle fed for 3 months because baby was unable to breastfeed after birth. She was told the baby probably never would. She called me as a last resort. I showed her how to hold the baby and support her breast, and baby latched on and breastfed like she’d been doing it all along.

Case 4—Baby born tongue tied and unable to latch. The parents were referred to a Dr. who clipped the frenulum, but didn’t clip enough so the tongue was still restricted. By the time the mother had called me, her milk supply was severely compromised. She worked on her milk production, finally got her son’s tongue properly released and continued to pump and bottle feed. Another lactation consultant told her “your baby has learned to like the bottle better” and he would never breastfeed. The baby and mom had other ideas. At 11 weeks this baby was 100% breastfed.

Case 5–(My favorite). This baby girl had been born with a cleft palate so she was unable to breastfeed or even use a regular bottle. Mom pumped for 4 months until the palate was repaired, hoping to breastfeed after her baby had healed from surgery. But she wasn’t successful. Finally, she called me at 7 months. When baby was sleepy, mom was able to coax her baby to the breast using a nipple shield. She suckled a bit then came off. I suggested she keep trying—that she had proved to us she could do it. A few months later I received an email from an elated mom telling me her baby had figured it out and at long last really breastfeeding!

I have many more stories of mothers and babies who persisted and triumphed. What about you? Do you have a story to share? Feel free to let us know by commenting here!

Important notice:  This blog and all its content and subsequent content is now at www.second9months.com.  Please visit there often for updates and new posts!

Alcohol and Breastfeeding

July 3, 2011

It is well known that alcohol consumption during pregnancy can harm the developing fetus. The placenta is not a barrier for toxic substances and even moderate drinking can cause devastating brain damage. But what about breastfeeding? Does that glass of wine you enjoyed with dinner pass into your breast milk? Do you need to be cautious about drinking alcohol?

The short answer is “yes.” The alcohol you consume enters your bloodstream almost immediately and, therefore, is in your milk rather quickly. Even though the alcohol does transfer to your milk, the amount of alcohol your baby experiences is much less than the amount you drink. Unlike the placenta, the breast provides some protection from most toxins in your bloodstream. According to Dr. Thomas Hale, the dose of alcohol in milk is less than 16% of the mother’s milk.

The amount of alcohol in your milk will peak 30 to 60 minutes after you enjoy your drink. After that time, the milk alcohol level decrease rapidly as long as you don’t have another drink. Alcohol is not stored in your milk. It quickly dissipates as your blood-alcohol level decreases.

There is no need to “pump and dump” (how I hate that phrase!) if you enjoy an occasional alcoholic beverage. But it is a good idea to time your drink for just after a breastfeeding session. That way most of the alcohol will be out of your bloodstream by the time your baby wants to breastfeed again.

After 40 weeks of abstaining, you may be excited about that first glass of wine. A note of caution from someone who has been there. Be careful! Many sleep-deprived mothers find alcohol packs a much bigger punch than before the pregnancy. If you choose to imbibe, take it slowly. Start with 1/3 to ½ of what you used to drink.

What about alcohol and milk supply? Some mothers are told to drink a beer so their milk will “come in” faster. Perhaps your wise, old grandmother advised you that beer would increase your supply. On the contrary, research has demonstrated that alcohol inhibits oxytocin release. Since oxytocin is responsible for your milk ejection reflex or let down, alcohol consumption actually decreases the amount of milk released from the breast during a feeding. Over time this can lead to a reduction in your milk supply.

Drinking during breastfeeding is a personal choice—one of many decisions that you will make as a mother. The bottom line is that alcohol in moderation, keeping in mind the timing of your drink, is probably not harmful. The American Academy of Pediatrics lists alcohol as “usually compatible” with breastfeeding. Excessive drinking while breastfeeding can, however, lead to developmental delays.

In summary:

    • Alcohol enters milk freely, but in lesser amounts than is in your bloodstream.
    • The peak level of alcohol in breast milk is 1/2-1 hour after it’s consumed.
    • If you choose to drink alcohol, time your drink for right after the baby nurses.
    • There is no need to pump and dump.
    • Waiting about 2 hours after having a drink is a general guideline to ensure complete metabolism of alcohol. (Based on a 180 lb. female)
    • Your milk is the best thing for your baby. Planning your alcohol consumption is advised over using formula to replace milk that may contain a small amount of alcohol.

If you’re too tipsy to safely hold your baby, you’re probably too tipsy to breastfeed! Use some previously pumped, alcohol-free milk instead.Important notice:  

This blog and all its content and subsequent content is now at www.second9months.com.  Please visit there often for updates and new posts!

 

Breastfeeding Myths Galore!

June 19, 2011

These are things that I see or read every day: From my clients, from professionals and websites focusing on newborn issues. I know that one post cannot squash these myths completely, but if this helps just a few moms obtain correct information, I’ll be very happy! Each one of these statements could be an entire post. As time goes on, I hope to link each myth with a thorough explanation as to why it’s a myth. But for now, read these and remember they are MYTHS!

Breastfeeding is painful for the first few weeks.

Engorgement is normal and is a sign that everything is going well.

There is not enough milk during the first few days after the birth, so most babies need some formula until the milk “comes in.”

Many women do not produce enough milk.

A baby should be on the breast for a certain amount of time.

A mother should wash her nipples with soap before feeding the baby.

Pumping is a good way of knowing how much milk you have.

If your breasts don’t feel full, that means your milk supply is inadequate.

If a mother is planning to breastfeed, she should buy a pump.

Infant formulas are almost the same as breast milk.

Doctors know a lot about breastfeeding.

Some babies are lactose intolerant.

Nipples need to “toughen up” in order to breastfeed.

If you give a baby a bottle, he will not like the breast any more.

If you breastfeed you will sleep less than if you bottle feed.

You can’t eat your favorite foods if you breastfeed.

You can’t have a glass of wine if you breastfeed.

Breastfeeding makes your breasts sag.

Breastfeeding takes a lot of time.

Dads can’t bond with the baby if baby is breastfed.

If you breastfeed, everyone can see your breasts.

After 6 months, breast milk provides no more benefit to the baby.

If you have twins or more, you will definitely need to use formula.

If your baby is gassy or cries a lot, it means he is allergic to your milk.

Your baby will sleep longer at night if you give her a bottle of formula.

If your baby doesn’t breastfeed in the first week, he probably never will.

If you have flat nipples, your baby won’t be able to breastfeed.

If your nipples are too big, your baby won’t be able to breastfeed.

If your breasts are too small, too big, too (fill in the blank), you won’t be able to breastfeed.

Have you encountered any myths about breastfeeding? Have you heard some things that just don’t sound right? Please, post them here in the comments box. I would love to hear from you!

Important notice:  This blog and all its content and subsequent content is now at www.second9months.com.  Please visit there often for updates and new posts!

Breast Milk Storage Guidelines

February 13, 2011

Your milk is a living thing! It is rich in antibodies that are constantly killing off nasty bacteria. For that reason, it is very stable and remains nutritious and safe even after it’s been expressed.

You may find a wide spectrum of guidelines written about the safety of breast milk at various temperatures. It can be confusing to try to figure out which source is correct. Why is there so much variability? The simple answer is that research is conducted in controlled situations and different populations have different needs. For example, pumped milk will last longer in a refrigerator that is never opened. A hospital environment with fragile, premature babies requires that milk be handled much more carefully than a home environment with a healthy baby.

What follows is a middle-of-the-road approach that considers the research as well as the less than perfect conditions that are found in our homes. The guidelines below assume that your baby full term and healthy.

Room temperature: 4 hours or until the next feeding. (No need to warm it up!)

Refrigerator: 5 days

Freezer: 3 months

Deep Freeze: 6 months

Whenever possible use fresh, refrigerated milk. Just as a freshly picked apple is more nutritious than an apple that’s been in cold storage for 3 months; your milk is most nutritious immediately after it’s been expressed. In addition, freezing destroys some of the live cells in your milk. So, if possible, store your precious milk in the fridge, leaving the frozen stash for emergencies.

Are you having a hard time creating a system for storing your milk for your return to work?  I can help! Call or email for a personalized phone consultation.

Breastfeeding and Obesity

January 4, 2011

You probably already know that childhood obesity has become a serious problem in the United States.  But did you know that formula feeding increases the risk that a child will develop obesity later in life? Breastfeeding your baby significantly decreases the chances that he will become overweight as an adult.  The Centers for Disease control and Prevention have reported:  “…for each month of exclusive breastfeeding, up to 9 months, the risk of obesity is decreased by 4%.”  In other words, the longer your baby breastfeeds, the less risk of obesity!

Every mother has her own personal reasons for choosing to breastfeed.  Maybe it’s because she is concerned about allergies. Perhaps she knows that formula feeding increases the risk of ear infections or other illness.   Whatever your reasons for breastfeeding, now you have one more.

So keep breastfeeding!   Every month brings new benefits!

For the complete press release: http://conta.cc/93162x.


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