Archive for the ‘Breastfeeding Twins’ Category

Nipple Confusion…Really?

September 7, 2011

I have never, in all my years of breastfeeding help, seen a case of nipple confusion. There, I said it. For many years I thought I saw it. I bought the whole concept that introduction of bottles too early would cause a baby to reject his mother’s breast. That somehow the baby would get “confused” and suddenly not know how to breastfeed.

So what made me change my tune? The babies themselves. They proved to me over and over again that the idea of nipple confusion is nonsense. They showed me that they are infant mammals and that mammals are hard-wired to do this thing we call breastfeeding. And they showed me that they are born to be adaptable and perfectly capable of adjusting to a wide variety of challenges that life doles out on a daily basis.

But, please… don’t listen to what I have to say about this. Listen to the babies. They taught me. Maybe they can teach you too!

Here are the stories of just a few of the many, many babies who teach me every day:

Case 1–Baby could not latch on to breast. Nipple shield was given to mom to help with latch and milk transfer. Baby used nipple shield for 4 months. By 5 months of age she had completely transitioned from the shield and was happily breastfeeding all by herself.

Case 2– Twins born prematurely. Neither could breastfeed at birth and needed a lot of help to suck at all. Eventually they learned to bottle feed well. Mom pumped for 3 months so these babies could have her milk. At 3 months, as mom was bathing with one of the babies, he rooted and latched and suckled. Encouraged, she tried to nurse the other twin and he did the same thing. They never looked back.

Case 3– Mom pumped and bottle fed for 3 months because baby was unable to breastfeed after birth. She was told the baby probably never would. She called me as a last resort. I showed her how to hold the baby and support her breast, and baby latched on and breastfed like she’d been doing it all along.

Case 4—Baby born tongue tied and unable to latch. The parents were referred to a Dr. who clipped the frenulum, but didn’t clip enough so the tongue was still restricted. By the time the mother had called me, her milk supply was severely compromised. She worked on her milk production, finally got her son’s tongue properly released and continued to pump and bottle feed. Another lactation consultant told her “your baby has learned to like the bottle better” and he would never breastfeed. The baby and mom had other ideas. At 11 weeks this baby was 100% breastfed.

Case 5–(My favorite). This baby girl had been born with a cleft palate so she was unable to breastfeed or even use a regular bottle. Mom pumped for 4 months until the palate was repaired, hoping to breastfeed after her baby had healed from surgery. But she wasn’t successful. Finally, she called me at 7 months. When baby was sleepy, mom was able to coax her baby to the breast using a nipple shield. She suckled a bit then came off. I suggested she keep trying—that she had proved to us she could do it. A few months later I received an email from an elated mom telling me her baby had figured it out and at long last really breastfeeding!

I have many more stories of mothers and babies who persisted and triumphed. What about you? Do you have a story to share? Feel free to let us know by commenting here!

Important notice:  This blog and all its content and subsequent content is now at www.second9months.com.  Please visit there often for updates and new posts!

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Breastfeeding Myths Galore!

June 19, 2011

These are things that I see or read every day: From my clients, from professionals and websites focusing on newborn issues. I know that one post cannot squash these myths completely, but if this helps just a few moms obtain correct information, I’ll be very happy! Each one of these statements could be an entire post. As time goes on, I hope to link each myth with a thorough explanation as to why it’s a myth. But for now, read these and remember they are MYTHS!

Breastfeeding is painful for the first few weeks.

Engorgement is normal and is a sign that everything is going well.

There is not enough milk during the first few days after the birth, so most babies need some formula until the milk “comes in.”

Many women do not produce enough milk.

A baby should be on the breast for a certain amount of time.

A mother should wash her nipples with soap before feeding the baby.

Pumping is a good way of knowing how much milk you have.

If your breasts don’t feel full, that means your milk supply is inadequate.

If a mother is planning to breastfeed, she should buy a pump.

Infant formulas are almost the same as breast milk.

Doctors know a lot about breastfeeding.

Some babies are lactose intolerant.

Nipples need to “toughen up” in order to breastfeed.

If you give a baby a bottle, he will not like the breast any more.

If you breastfeed you will sleep less than if you bottle feed.

You can’t eat your favorite foods if you breastfeed.

You can’t have a glass of wine if you breastfeed.

Breastfeeding makes your breasts sag.

Breastfeeding takes a lot of time.

Dads can’t bond with the baby if baby is breastfed.

If you breastfeed, everyone can see your breasts.

After 6 months, breast milk provides no more benefit to the baby.

If you have twins or more, you will definitely need to use formula.

If your baby is gassy or cries a lot, it means he is allergic to your milk.

Your baby will sleep longer at night if you give her a bottle of formula.

If your baby doesn’t breastfeed in the first week, he probably never will.

If you have flat nipples, your baby won’t be able to breastfeed.

If your nipples are too big, your baby won’t be able to breastfeed.

If your breasts are too small, too big, too (fill in the blank), you won’t be able to breastfeed.

Have you encountered any myths about breastfeeding? Have you heard some things that just don’t sound right? Please, post them here in the comments box. I would love to hear from you!

Important notice:  This blog and all its content and subsequent content is now at www.second9months.com.  Please visit there often for updates and new posts!

Breastfeed Twins? Yes!

January 12, 2011

If you’re expecting twins, you may be wondering…Is it possible to breastfeed twins? Can my body make enough milk for two babies? Can I really nourish my babies without using formula? The answers are yes, yes and yes!

Your Dr., your doula and your childbirth educator may all have told you, “Most women can’t make enough milk for 2 babies.” Don’t believe them! If your body is equipped to breastfeed one baby, it is highly likely that you will have sufficient milk for 2.

Arnie and Ashley

Last week I met with the parents of these 2 babies to help them with breastfeeding. They told me I was the first professional to say that they could expect to fully breastfeed their twins. They attended a prenatal twins class and the instructor told them “…hardly anyone is able to breastfeed twins without supplementing…” Immediately after giving birth, the nurses in the hospital told the mom, “you are going to have to supplement. They will starve if you only breastfeed.” The next day the pediatrician saw them in the hospital and told the mom, “Your milk isn’t in yet. You need to supplement.” Their doula who considers herself an expert on twins said, “I have never seen a mom 100 percent breastfeed twins.” Well, guess what! After some guidance and adjustments to their routine, these babies are now breastfeeding with no supplementation.

You body is made to breastfeed! It expects to breastfeed. And when you are carrying twins, your body knows you have twins and transmits the information to your breasts. Before you even give birth, your breasts are gearing up for double duty! In fact, research shows that moms of twins produce more than twice as much milk as moms of singletons. Now that’s preparation!

Remember the concept of supply and demand. The more your babies breastfeed, the more milk you produce. If your babies can’t breastfeed immediately after birth (or if one baby can’t breastfeed), use a hospital-grade pump to encourage and maintain milk production.

Will breastfeeding twins be challenging? Of course! Having twins is not easy. You will be learning about 2 babies at once and learning about breastfeeding at the same time. Without a doubt, there will be a steep learning curve. Once you and the babies have figured it out, however, breastfeeding two will be as easy as breastfeeding one!


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